Pyloric stenosis symptoms

What are the pyloric stenosis symptoms? The important symptom of pyloric stenosis is forceful or projectile vomiting followed by hunger.

Pyloric stenosis symptoms

Signs of pyloric stenosis usually appear within three to six weeks after birth. Pyloric stenosis is rare in babies older than age three months. However, it even occurs in adults.

Pyloric stenosis symptoms in infants and children

  • Vomiting may be mild at first usually appears any time in the first weeks to months of birth.
  • Vomiting gradually becomes severe as the pylorus opening narrows.
  • Vomiting occurs immediately or within 30 minutes after eating. There is always forceful ejection of stomach content up to several feet away like a fountain called projectile vomiting.
  • The vomiting is generally non-bile stained (non-bilious).
  • Wave-like stomach contractions may appear that ripple across the upper abdomen soon after feeding your child and before vomiting. This is due to stomach muscles straining to force food through the narrowed pylorus.
  • The infant is hungry immediately after vomiting and wants to feed again.
  • Overly fussy behavior followed by lethargy (due to excessive tiredness).
  • Urinate much less frequently compared with other infants.
  • Lesser bowel movement is due to this condition preventing food from reaching the small intestine. These babies mostly have constipation or harder stools.
  • Babies cry without tears, may be due to dehydration.
  • Weight problems are common, difficult gaining weight.

Pylorus stenosis symptoms in adults

  • Vomiting may be mild during the beginning. Vomiting is gradually progressed as the pylorus opening narrows.
  • Vomiting occurs immediately or within 30 minutes after eating. There is always forceful ejection of stomach content up to several feet away like a fountain called projectile vomiting.
  • The vomit may sometimes contain blood.
  • The vomiting is generally non-bile stained (non-bilious).
  • Wave-like stomach contractions may appear that ripple across the upper abdomen soon after you have ingested the food and before vomiting. This is due to stomach muscles straining to force food through the narrowed pylorus.
  • You feel hungry immediately after vomiting and want to eat again.
  • Overly fussy behavior followed by lethargy (due to excessive tiredness).
  • Urinate much less frequently compared with others.
  • Lesser bowel movement is due to this condition preventing foods from reaching the small intestine. Thus, patients mostly have constipation or harder stools.
  • Weight loss is common.